The "T" in IoT

A wise man once said: “The Internet of Things has a profound lack of things”. Well, this is true, so let’s push the state of IoT a small step in the right direction, by adding some things. A “thing” doesn’t necessarily imply something new and innovative. It doesn’t have to be disruptive either. Significant value can be added in a business domain by simply IoT enabling existing devices - like, in this example, pinball or vending machines. »

The LLC (Little LoRa Collider)

Some things are notoriously hard to test. Since we’re not designing our own gateway or packet forwarder (yet…), we end up having this third party “thing” between our beautiful Congress backend and our elegant EE02 LoRa modules. This “thing” being a LoRa gateway, which behaviour we simply have to trust. It should (in order to claim to be a LoRa gateway) reliably implement all the happy path scenarios needed for a successful LoRa deployment. »

Author image Hans Jørgen Grimstad on #ee02, #lora,

Introducing Congress - the LoRa-as-a-service...service!

What is it? You probably wonder “what’s this Congress you are talking about?” just. Since the raven is our mascot we googled around a bit and settled on Congress as in “a congress of ravens”. It is - in short - a lora-as-a-service that we’ve built over the last year. Where is it? The console can be found at https://lora.engineering/ – register an account with Telenor CONNECT and it’s ready to use. »

Using AWS IoT with Congress

There’s a lot of different cloud IoT providers out there and Amazon is one of the biggest (if not the biggest). They started out relatively simple with EC2 and have added new services and features at a blistering pace the last few years AWS IoT is one of them. They have a fairly simple model: The devices are referred to as things (obviously), data from devices is stored in thing shadows and that’s about it. »

Using LoPy devices with Congress

The LoPy devices from Pycom are quite neat: You get a relatively small device with built-in LoRa, BLE and WiFi support, GPIO pins, SPI, I2C and programming them is as simple as writing a few lines of Python. They’ve made plugins for both Atom and Visual Studio Code but if you have the One True Editor you can upload the files both via FTP and the serial port. Install the (optional) software If you are using Atom or Visual Studio Code there’s a plugin named Pymakr that will help you deploy your code. »